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Search Results for "Seabirds and shorebirds": 537 images

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Image Photographer
Chad King
Location
Pacific Grove
Species
Heermann's Gull (Larus heermanni)
Pelagic red crab (Pleuroncodes planipes)
Caption
Heerman's gull (Larus heermanni, adult non-breeding plumage) dining on a red pelagic crab (Pleuroncodes planipes) offshore of Pacific Grove. Red pelagic crabs (Pleuroncodes planipes) washed up on Coral Street Beach in Pacific Grove, CA beginning October 7, 2015. This is an exceedingly unusual event for the Monterey area, as these crabs are normally offshore of Baja California, but warm waters have transported them north. These crabs haven't washed ashore in this area since 1982-1983, an El Nino year. NOAA is tracking a current El Nino that has contributed to the warm water plume, and it is assumed the two events are once again related. Pleuroncodes stranding events are rare occurrences in Monterey Bay and usually coincide with ENSO events. The species was first discovered in 1859 during a mass-stranding event in Monterey. Further stranding events in Monterey occurred later in 1959 and again in 1969. Dr. Steve Webster, senior marine biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, noted that when present, seagulls were feeding on so many crabs that they could not get airborne. Pleuroncodes are also a source of food for fishes, rays, and pinnipeds (seals and sea lions).

Image Photographer
Chad King
Location
Pacific Grove
Species
Heermann's Gull (Larus heermanni)
Pelagic red crab (Pleuroncodes planipes)
Caption
Heerman's gull (Larus heermanni, adult non-breeding plumage) dining on a red pelagic crab (Pleuroncodes planipes) offshore of Pacific Grove. Red pelagic crabs (Pleuroncodes planipes) washed up on Coral Street Beach in Pacific Grove, CA beginning October 7, 2015. This is an exceedingly unusual event for the Monterey area, as these crabs are normally offshore of Baja California, but warm waters have transported them north. These crabs haven't washed ashore in this area since 1982-1983, an El Nino year. NOAA is tracking a current El Nino that has contributed to the warm water plume, and it is assumed the two events are once again related. Pleuroncodes stranding events are rare occurrences in Monterey Bay and usually coincide with ENSO events. The species was first discovered in 1859 during a mass-stranding event in Monterey. Further stranding events in Monterey occurred later in 1959 and again in 1969. Dr. Steve Webster, senior marine biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, noted that when present, seagulls were feeding on so many crabs that they could not get airborne. Pleuroncodes are also a source of food for fishes, rays, and pinnipeds (seals and sea lions).

Image Photographer
Chad King
Location
Davidson Seamount
Species
Cook's petrel (Pterodroma cookii)
Caption
This Cook's petrel (Pterodroma cookii) was photographed from the FSV Bell M. Shimada while conducting a marine mammal and seabird survey over the Davidson Seamount. Cook�s petrel migrates to the Pacific Ocean from New Zealand when it is not breeding.

Image Photographer
Chad King
Location
Davidson Seamount
Species
Cook's petrel (Pterodroma cookii)
Caption
This Cook's petrel (Pterodroma cookii) was photographed from the FSV Bell M. Shimada while conducting a marine mammal and seabird survey over the Davidson Seamount. Cook�s petrel migrates to the Pacific Ocean from New Zealand when it is not breeding.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)
Caption
Red-breasted merganser (female) swimming and foraging in Elkhorn Slough near Jetty Road and the culverts.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)
Caption
Red-breasted merganser (female) swimming and foraging in Elkhorn Slough near Jetty Road and the culverts.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)
Caption
Red-breasted merganser (female) swimming and foraging in Elkhorn Slough near Jetty Road and the culverts.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator)
Caption
Red-breasted Merganser (male) swimming and foraging in Elkhorn Slough near Jetty Road and the culverts.

Image Photographer
Jason Thompson
Location
Marin County
Species
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Caption
This appears to be a female Common Merganser. The very similar looking female Red-breasted Merganser does not have a white chin patch, which this female has. Also, the body is a more uniform gray, typical of Common Merganser females.

Image Photographer
Tim Huntington
Location
Big Sur
Species
California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
Caption
This photo was taken at Sea Lion Point (not sure if that's its official name or not) just north of the Coast Gallery (or about half a mile south of Grimes Point).

Image Photographer
S. G. Lane
Location
Pebble Beach
Species
Wandering Tattler (Tringa incana)
Caption
Breeding plumage of the Wandering Tattler Tringa incana. Taken August 3, 2012 at Spanish Bay, Pebble Beach, CA a couple of hundred yards down the boardwalk from the parking lot.

Image Photographer
Tim Huntington
Location
Big Sur
Species
California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
Caption
This image was taken near McWay Rocks.

Image Photographer
Tim Huntington
Location
Big Sur
Species
California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
Caption
This image was taken near McWay Rocks.

Image Photographer
Jason Thompson
Location
Marin County
Species
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)
Caption
Male Common Merganser.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)
Caption
Black-bellied Plover Pluvialis squatarola, a male that is transitioning into breeding plumage.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)
Caption
Black-bellied Plover Pluvialis squatarola, a male that is transitioning into breeding plumage. Foraging in the intertidal mud flats.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)
Caption
Black-bellied Plover Pluvialis squatarola, a male that is transitioning into breeding plumage. Foraging in the intertidal mud flats.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Elkhorn Slough
Species
Black-bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola)
Caption
Black-bellied Plover Pluvialis squatarola, a male that is transitioning into breeding plumage. When the change is complete, the entire belly, throat and part of the face will be solid black.

Image Photographer
Joyce Gross
Location
San Francisco Bay
Species
Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris)
Caption
Clapper Rail Rallus longirostris foraging in marsh habitat.

Image Photographer
Steve Lonhart
Location
Moss State Beach
Species
Long-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus scolopaceus)
Caption
Likely Long-billed Dowitchers Limnodromus scolopaceus. They were foraging in the northern marsh just past the Jetty Road culvert.

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